Featured Artist: Chris Fallows

by Frank Gibson, SRC media intern

When most people think of shark week, the first image that comes to their head is one of a Great White Shark soaring into the air in pursuit of seals. What most people may not know is that the man responsible for these incredible images is Chris Fallows. Chris began tagging sharks in South Africa in 1989 and with the help of local fisherman, was able to tag and release over 1500 sharks and Rays. It wasn’t until 1996 however when Chris and a fellow colleague discovered the fierce breach hunting tactics of the South African White Sharks. Chris uses this combination of location and time around sharks to educate and expose people first-hand to the awesome beauty of these apex predators in their natural environment.
Photo credit: Chris Fallows

Photo credit: Chris Fallows

In addition to his shark expeditions, Chris has also used his experience and position to help study and conserve this vulnerable species of shark. He has cataloged over 5500 predatory events during his time at Seal Island which has created the largest database of it’s kind. He has also co-authored four scientific papers on predatory behavior and has authored his own book on White Sharks titled “Great White and The Majesty of Sharks.”

Photo: Chris Fallows

Photo: Chris Fallows

Chris helps further ocean conservation by working with the Shark Research Team to collect data on white sharks, organize research excursions and by documenting them on film. He works with Dr. Neil Hammerschlag from the University of Miami by sending data year round on white shark populations and behavior and has even collaborated on research papers with Dr. Hammerschlag. One such project was the investigation of white sharks scavenging on whale carcasses. Overall, SRC is grateful for the time and energy Chris Fallows puts into shark conservation. You can check out many of Chris’ photos and his work at his website.

Photo: Chris Fallows

Photo: Chris Fallows

White sharks scavenging on whales from R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation on Vimeo.

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