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SRC Highlights in 2019

UM SRC had a productive 2019. Here are some of the highlights we are proud to share with you. We published 13 research papers in scientific journals. These papers ranged in scientific topics from determining the ecosystem consequences of shark declines to determining the extent to which sharks are under threat from commercial fishing. Two […]

Refugia under threat: Mass bleaching of coral assemblages in high‐latitude eastern Australia

By Victor Munoz, SRC MPS student When hearing about the effects of climate change on coral reefs, most will likely think of damage from coral bleaching events (Goldberg & Wilkinson, 2004). Because bleaching has been associated with higher sea temperatures, coral reefs exposed to colder waters can sometimes be viewed as more resilient to rises […]

Don’t Treat Your Marine Sediments Like Dirt

By Sander Elliot, SRC intern Marine sediments are home to a surprisingly diverse ecosystem of global importance. Subseafloor Life and its Biogeological Impacts (D’Hondt et al., 2019) overviews this ecosystem and roles it plays. Marine sediments are often overlooked because they are removed from our daily lives. If one takes the time to look into […]

Foraging energetics and prey density requirements of western North Atlantic blue whales in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada

By Nicholas Martinez, SRC intern Pelagic predators throughout the world’s oceans face the same challenge: foraging for food in an environment where much of their prey are available in clusters, centralized around specific areas of the ocean. For this reason, many pelagic predators have unique ways to find these limited resources, all the while adjusting […]

Preventing ecosystems from feeling clammy: what monitoring giant clam populations can tell us about human perseverance

By Maria Geoly, SRC Intern Every aspect of our lives depends on the health of our natural resources. Clean water, nutrient rich soil, and access to timber are often considered humanity’s three most essential natural resources because they provide the four essential needs of living things: oxygen, water, food, and shelter. Often overlooked, however, is […]

Mapping the global network of fisheries science collaboration

By Julia Saltzman, SRC intern Collaboration is something which we all learn about as children. We are taught to work together in teams, to share our toys, and that ideas are better when many individuals contribute to them. As science has become increasingly internationalized, scholars investigating the shifting spatial structure have posed questions to whether […]

Climate variability and life history impact stress, thyroid, and immune markers in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) during El Niño conditions

By Isabelle Geller, SRC intern There are many situations which may increase the level of stress in an animal – for example, not being able to eat enough food to meet energy demands or being in temperatures above or below a tolerable range they can. DeRango et al. (2019) aimed to study both of these […]

Northward range expansion in spring-staging barnacle geese is a response to climate change and population growth, mediated by individual experience

By Gaitlyn Malone, SRC Masters Student As climate change continues to rapidly alter environments, it is important to investigate how these changes impact the species that utilize these areas. When faced with these alterations, organisms will often have to adjust their behaviors in order to increase their survival. Animals that migrate long distances in order […]

The Negative Effects to Prevalent Plastic Pollution

By Delaney Reynolds, SRC intern Plastic pollution has become one of the largest adverse impacts on marine life to date. In the last 70 years, plastic debris has become so prominent in layers of sedimentary deposits that it can be used as a primary indicator for the Anthropocene, a human-induced geological epoch (Puskic, et al. […]