Stylish & Saving the Oceans! Your Help is Needed! “ShopForSharks.Com”

Look Great, While Also Saving the Oceans…

 

Dear all,

It is with great excitement that I inform you of a new initiative from the RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation Program at the University of Miami (RJD).

We have created an online shop with extremely cool fashion items and gear. All proceeds go directly to supporting RJD’s marine education, research and conservation efforts.

Look Great, While Also Saving the Oceans…

http://www.ShopForSharks.com

or

https://www.sharkresearch.rsmas.miami.edu/shop

 

Please also share these links with others…The only way for this initiative to work is to engage the public through our social networks.

Thus, please distribute these links far and wide!

Go To: http://www.ShopForSharks.com

Stylish & Saving the Oceans! Your Help is Needed! “ShopForSharks.Com”

Look Great, While Also Saving the Oceans…

 

Dear all,

It is with great excitement that I inform you of a new initiative from the RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation Program at the University of Miami (RJD).

We have created an online shop with extremely cool fashion items and gear. All proceeds go directly to supporting RJD’s marine education, research and conservation efforts.

Look Great, While Also Saving the Oceans…

http://www.ShopForSharks.com

or

https://www.sharkresearch.rsmas.miami.edu/shop

 

Please also share these links with others…The only way for this initiative to work is to engage the public through our social networks.

Thus, please distribute these links far and wide!

Go To: http://www.ShopForSharks.com

Sad day for sharks: 2 Pregnant sharks killed from destructive fishing (49 sharks killed total)

I am sad to report that within the last 24 hours, 2 pregnant sharks were killed.

The first  shark that washed up on shore, was in the Florida Keys yesterday. It was a 9 ft pregnant bull shark with 12 dead pups that were ready to be born.

 

Dead 9 ft pregnant Bull shark washed up on beach as a result of beach fishing. Shark had two “J” hooks in it’s gills (Click to enlarge)

12 dead bull shark pups (click to enlarge)

The second shark washed up this afternoon, was on Delray Beach. It was a 13 ft pregnant hammerhead shark with 35 dead pups that were ready to be born.

Dead 13 ft pregnant Hammerhead with J Hook (click to enlarge)

35 dead hammerhead pups (Click to enlarge)

Both sharks were entering nearshore waters to give birth when they were captured. Witnesses reported in both areas land-based shark fishing activities in the area the previous night.

Both sharks were found dead with “J” hooks;  one shark had double “J” hooks lodged in its gills.

Luckily, team members from the RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation Program were able to respond and collect data, photos and samples.

So in less than 24 hrs, Florida lost 49 sharks (36 hammerheads & 13 bull sharks), of which 2 were reproductive females likely helping sustain the local nearshore population.

12 dead bull shark pups that were ready to be born (Click to enlarge)

It is sad to see such waste.

I am a strong supporter and promoter of responsible & sustainable catch & release fishing. However, I do not support fishing with destructive gear (J hooks) for threatened and pregnant species in areas and times of year where they congregate to give birth. This is just not responsible.

I think we need to consider at least the following regulations:

1) Only shark fishing with “Circle” hooks. This has already been instituted as part of Florida law for other fishes like groupers and snappers.

Circle hooks generally allow safe hooking of sharks in the side of the mouth, where they can be easily and quickly removed (this is compared to J hooks that sometimes cause gut or gill hooking which can be lethal).

2) Establishing protection for pregnant female sharks during the breeding season, especially threatened species like hammerhead and bulls.

3) Establishing standards and protocols for gear configurations and techniques for shark fishing that reduce fight, handling, and air exposure times, which will promote successful catch & release.

In addition, I think more research is needed to examine the effects of different types of catch & release fishing on post-release mortality to help better inform anglers on how to conduct sustainable catch & release fishing, which I support. I also believe more research identifying critical habitat for shark congregation, mating & pupping for conservation. Most importantly, we need to educate the public about threats facing sharks and how they can make a difference.

Most fishermen are responsible and ethical. The irresponsible minority reflects badly on everyone else. Responsible catch & release shark fishing is sustainable and many practice this. We just need to get everyone on board!

Brendal Davis & Mary O’Malley with dead hammerhead pups

Thank you to Curt & Kelli Slonim, Brendal Davis & Mary O’Malley for responding and being on the scene to collect data, take photos and educate the public!

Please provide your comments below and forward this to others!

Thank you for your time,

Neil Hammerschlag, Ph.D.
…………………………………..
Research Assistant Professor,
Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science (RSMAS)
Leonard & Jayne Abess Center for Ecosystem Science & Policy

Director, RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation Program

University of Miami
4600 Rickenbacker Cswy, Miami, Florida, 33149

E-mail: nhammerschlag@rsmas.miami.edu
O: 305.421.4356    F: 305.421.4675   C: 305.951.6577

<<< Personal Website: http://www.neilhammer.com >>>

<<< RJ Dunlap Website: https://www.sharkresearch.rsmas.miami.edu >>>

New R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program at University of Miami Fosters Ocean Science for Future Generations

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program at
University of Miami Fosters
Ocean Science for Future Generations

Shark expert Hammerschlag to lead program to promote interest in research and conservation, provide hands-on learning opportunities for students

Neil w/ tiger shark

Photo by: Eric Cheng

MIAMI — January 18, 2010 — The University of Miami (UM) today announced the inauguration of the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program, a joint program of the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science and the Leonard and Jayne Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy. Named in honor of businessman and conservationist Richard James Dunlap, the program will focus on advancing ocean research through exciting hands-on field and virtual learning experiences for high school and university students.

“Our goal, in establishing this program is to honor the memory of my late husband, who was an avid outdoorsman and who had a keen interest in protecting the environment in the Florida Keys, which he came to love through the years,” said Marian Dunlap. “We hope to create a longstanding legacy that will help us to better understand what is happening with these precious resources and how we can sustain them in the 21st Century and beyond, so future generations can enjoy them as well.”

The Intersection of Science & Policy

The program enables UM to build upon its internationally recognized programs in marine and ecosystem science and foster innovative interdisciplinary approaches to emerging environmental issues. The Rosenstiel School offers one of the largest, most dynamic marine and atmospheric programs in the nation that will offer cutting-edge scientific support for the new program. The Abess Center, led by University of Miami Professor and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Kenny Broad, will provide support in the form of innovative initiatives that bridge the gap between hard science and environmental policy.

“We are very pleased that the Dunlap family recognizes the value of an interdisciplinary approach to complex environmental research,” said Donna E. Shalala, president of the University of Miami.  “Because the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program lies squarely in the intersection between science and policy, it will provide students across the University of Miami, and high school students, including those in underserved populations, with access to field experiences that will foster intellectual curiosity and help to position them as effective environmental leaders for the future.”

Protecting the Marine Environment

Field and virtual expeditions will expose students and teachers from across the globe to the importance of oceans in our daily lives. Through the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program they will learn about the threats facing ocean resources and their adjacent coasts, and explore solutions for conservation. Educational opportunities will be tailored for those in land-locked communities, as well as those in underserved populations where there may not be a regular focus on ocean studies.

“Through these practical opportunities, regardless of where they are located, students will be able to experience the complex environmental issues that we need to address as a society,” said Roni Avissar, dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. “We look forward to a long-term, productive partnership with the Dunlap family in the cause of environmental conservation, and are eagerly anticipating the results of this program in the form of science-based resource management decisions and scientific publications.”

A Proven Model

The new program will follow the model established by the wildly successful South Florida Student Shark Program (SFSSP), a collaborative, multi-disciplinary research and education program.  Founded in 2006 by Dr. David Dié and Rosenstiel School graduate student Neil Hammerschlag, the SFSSP is a full-immersion program that focuses primarily on the study and conservation of Floridian shark species, encouraging students to take an active role in modern scientific education and research.

“Through this generous gift we will be able to expand the program to address other marine species, and reach new audiences around the world,” said Dr. Neil Hammerschlag, director of the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program. “One unique offering is our ‘Adopt a Shark’ program, which will enable us to track great hammerhead and bull sharks using sophisticated satellite tags that students will help to attach to live animals that will allow us to better understand their migratory routes and habits, which will assist us in creating stronger policies to protect these critically threatened species.”

Remembering R.J. Dunlap

Born in Wilmette, Illinois, Richard James Dunlap was the son of L.J. and Marie Dunlap.  As a boy he had a family friend and entrepreneur who taught him how to fish and appreciate nature – a love that would expand to all outdoor activities and would persist throughout his life.  In 1938, R.J.’s parents packed Dick into their car and drove from Illinois all the way down to Key West, Fla.  This vacation in the Florida Keys created a special place in his heart for the chain of islands. Dick vowed to return, but did not do so until the 1970’s.

While in V5 Officers Training for the U.S. Navy during World War II, R.J. attended the University of Michigan and obtained his degree in Business Administration, he took a job with the Northern Trust Company of Chicago. After a period of time he went on to the University of Iowa and graduated with his degree in law. After Law School he was an insurance broker specializing in estate planning and group insurance.

In 1948, R.J. met a nursing student named Marian. Within a month, the goal-oriented R.J. courted and married her. They would be inseparable until the time of his death.

R.J. struck out on his own and founded Employee Benefit Plans in 1960, with Marian at his side.  He was dubbed the “Father of Self-Insurance” by the Wall Street Journal, for bringing this business concept to the forefront – a concept that is still very popular today.  Ever an astute businessman, R.J. used his knowledge of the industry to expand his business interests; he started a Surgery Center and had a Hobby Craft Factory, and before long he was serving on the boards of several companies, leaving his imprint on their operations.

An avid outdoorsman, R.J. founded and was president of the Minnesota Geese, which played a major role in Canadian goose repopulation throughout the Midwest.  He also presided over the Pipe Lake Gun Club, to help promote the love of outdoors and protection of wetlands.  R.J. spent many family vacations and hosted business conferences at Rainbow Bend in the FL Keys. It is here that he and his four children, Christopher, Kim, Leslie and Melinda, would explore the marine environment. He was also influential in inspiring the love of the ocean to his grandchildren through fishing, boating, snorkeling and diving.

In 1986, at the age of 60, R.J. passed away. But he left a strong legacy.  Not only did he leave behind a cadre of profitable companies, but he left his imprint in terms of helping to create a more sustainable environment.  Most importantly, however, his wife Marian, and four children, ten grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren are a testament to his successful life, and they continue to carry out his dreams.  Established through a founding donation from Marian Dunlap in honor of her late husband, the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program at the University of Miami now provides exciting opportunities for students to advance ocean conservation and participate in cutting-edge hands-on projects.

About the University of Miami The University of Miami’s mission is to educate and nurture students, to create knowledge, and to provide service to our community and beyond. Committed to excellence and proud of the diversity of our University family, we strive to develop future leaders of our nation and the world.

South Florida Shark Conservation Event – Jan 10

For those in Florida, I encourage you to attend the South Florida Shark Conservation Party on Jan 10.

For more info and to RSVP, please visit:

http://floridashark.pingg.com/2010SharkParty

Happy New Year,
Neil