Featured Artist: Chris Fallows

by Frank Gibson, SRC media intern

When most people think of shark week, the first image that comes to their head is one of a Great White Shark soaring into the air in pursuit of seals. What most people may not know is that the man responsible for these incredible images is Chris Fallows. Chris began tagging sharks in South Africa in 1989 and with the help of local fisherman, was able to tag and release over 1500 sharks and Rays. It wasn’t until 1996 however when Chris and a fellow colleague discovered the fierce breach hunting tactics of the South African White Sharks. Chris uses this combination of location and time around sharks to educate and expose people first-hand to the awesome beauty of these apex predators in their natural environment.
Photo credit: Chris Fallows

Photo credit: Chris Fallows

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Video of the Week: Project Noah

As part of the MAF 579 course in Citizen and Participatory Science, guest speaker Yasser Ansari discusses his motivations and interests in founding Project Noah, a platform and app for documenting species diversity around the world. He spoke to the students via Skype. The course is part of the required curriculum for students in the new University of Miami Exploration Science Professional Masters program, which is based at UM’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) and jointly administered with the UM Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy. Thank you Yasser for a great presentation.

Project Noah Founder Yasser Ansari presents to a Citizen Science graduate studies class at the University of Miami. courtesy of Dr. Keene Haywood.

Photo of the Week: American Alligator

Deep in Everglades National Park, Dr. Neil Hammerschlag captured this extreme close-up view of an American Alligator. To learn more about this predator and their vital role in the ecosystem, visit: http://www.nps.gov/ever/naturescience/alligatorindepth.htm

Deep in Everglades National Park, Dr. Neil Hammerschlag captured this extreme close-up view of an American Alligator. To learn more about this predator and their vital role in the ecosystem, visit: http://www.nps.gov/ever/naturescience/alligatorindepth.htm

Photo of the Week: Allofus the Tiger Shark

Allofus the tiger shark is the adoptive shark of Barbra Weintraub. You can follow her movements at: https://sharkresearch.rsmas.miami.edu/education/virtual-learning/tracking-sharks/allofus. Photo by Frank Gibson.

Allofus the tiger shark is the adoptive shark of Barbra Weintraub. You can follow her movements at: https://sharkresearch.rsmas.miami.edu/education/virtual-learning/tracking-sharks/allofus Photo by Frank Gibson.

Photo of the Week: Queen Angelfish

A queen angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris) swims along a coral reef near Miami, Florida.

A queen angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris) swims along a coral reef near Miami, Florida.

Photo of the Week: Bull Shark

A large male bull shark is pulled toward the research vessel for sampling and tagging. He is soon thereafter released in great condition.

A large male bull shark is pulled toward the research vessel for sampling and tagging. He is soon thereafter released in great condition.

Photo of the Week: Great Hammerhead

A Great Hammerhead shark sweeps across the sand in Bimini, Bahamas. Photo Credit: Christine Shepard

A Great Hammerhead shark sweeps across the sand in Bimini, Bahamas. Photo Credit: Christine Shepard

New Educational Activity: Mercury & Sharks

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks: Part 1With great excitement, we would like to announce a brand-new educational activity now offered here on the RJD website! Utilizing a subset of data from RJD shark research trips, you can investigate the bioaccumulation of methyl mercury in South Florida shark populations.

Broken down into two worksheets, the first part will provide you with a strong background knowledge of what bioaccumulation is and how methyl mercury affects human health.

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks: Part 2The second part will walk you through a color-coded Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, organizing and analyzing mercury values found in shark muscle tissue. Then, you will be asked to draw conclusions based on your findings.

As a note, the curriculum is geared toward high school students and above, but anyone is welcome to give it a try! We hope that you will enjoy this new activity, and share your feedback with us. Also, feel free to explore our opportunities for participation in the field, collecting data just like what is used in this worksheet.

New Educational Activity: Mercury & Sharks

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks: Part 1With great excitement, we would like to announce a brand-new educational activity now offered here on the RJD website! Utilizing a subset of data from RJD shark research trips, you can investigate the bioaccumulation of methyl mercury in South Florida shark populations.

Broken down into two worksheets, the first part will provide you with a strong background knowledge of what bioaccumulation is and how methyl mercury affects human health.

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks: Part 2The second part will walk you through a color-coded Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, organizing and analyzing mercury values found in shark muscle tissue. Then, you will be asked to draw conclusions based on your findings.

As a note, the curriculum is geared toward high school students and above, but anyone is welcome to give it a try! We hope that you will enjoy this new activity, and share your feedback with us. Also, feel free to explore our opportunities for participation in the field, collecting data just like what is used in this worksheet.

Photo of the Week: Invasive Lionfish

A fisherman spears an invasive lionfish in the warm, shallow waters of Nassau, Bahamas.

A fisherman spears an invasive lionfish in the warm, shallow waters of Nassau, Bahamas.